30 for 30 — Adoration

“Could you not keep watch with me for one hour?”

-Mt 26:40

ESPN has a series of sports movies that it calls “30 for 30”. Starting February 21, we will begin our own 30 for 30. On that day, we will extend Eucharistic Adoration in the church to 9 am – 5 pm and continue it each Wednesday in Lent.

Whenever the Eucharist is exposed, at least two people should be there (one is always required). So, our sign-up sheet in the church vestibule includes two people for every half hour during those eight hours (except for 12-12:30 for Mass). So, my quick Gonzaga math (!) tells me that 2 people times 15 half hours equals 30 people. That means we are asking for 30 people to commit for 30 minutes of Adoration during Lent. 30 for 30!

What we be even better, of course, is if all 30 people made a full hour of Adoration. Jesus desires that of us (e.g., Mt 26:40).

Parishes that have stepped up their hours of Adoration have received extraordinary graces. Dioceses that have grown Adoration in their parishes have experienced an increase in vocations particularly with the priesthood. For individuals, God gives many graces to those who adore Jesus in the Eucharist. So, I promise you that the Lord will reward our parish and each one of you for going 30 for 30! He is never outdone in generosity.

Below are some quotes and testimonies about Eucharistic Adoration from www.eucharisticadoration.ie.

I hope that 30 of us experience the graces of Adoration this Lent and write our own testimony one day!

May you know the peace of Christ,

Fr. Greg

——————————————–

Indeed, this is the will of My Father, that everyone who looks upon the Son and believes in Him, will have eternal life. Him I will raise up on the last day” – John 6:40.

“I have a burning desire to be honored in the Blessed Sacrament” – Jesus said to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque.

“What we need in every parish, to come before Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament frequently in holy hours of prayer” – St. Teresa of Calcutta.

“The most efficacious way to grow in holiness, is time spent with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament” – Pope Paul VI

“The Church and the world have a great need for Eucharistic worship. Jesus waits for us in the Sacrament of Love. Let us be generous with our time in going to meet Him in adoration and contemplation that is full of faith…May our adoration never cease” – St. John Paul II

“The zeal to carry evangelization to the ends of the earth comes from contemplation and adoration of the Lord Jesus” – Pope Francis

Testimonies

In recent times I had a feeling I wanted to do more than go to Mass each week. I felt in recent times, as if the Lord was calling me to do a little more. Then one Sunday a few months ago, a speaker from the Apostolate of Eucharistic Adoration was speaking at all the Masses in our Parish. During his talk he invited people to think in terms of a weekly commitment to Eucharistic Adoration.

Weekly Adoration for at least two days a week was about to begin in our Parish. There was emphasis on the need for commitment of an hour a week and that the spiritual benefits to individuals, families and the parish were enormous…since I have started weekly Adoration I look forward so much to my hour with the Lord. It is now, even after a short time, a real priority in my life. I continue to pray that other members of my family will follow. I keep telling them how much it means to me and that you have to experience it to appreciate it. – Angela

“…the most peaceful time of the week, my hour at Eucharistic Adoration” – Mary.

“I have been coming to weekly silent Adoration for a good while now. It just amazes me that anytime of the day, I can find Jesus here waiting for me. We are so fortunate to have such a treasure in our parish. Long may it last!”

“…Adoration…was the first time in years that I experienced peace in my life and I wanted more of this…It has made such a difference in my life…I am still very busy at various things but the hour in Adoration seems to help me to have a clearer head and do things more effectively and efficiently.

I now realize after all these years that the busier you are the more you need the Lord and one of the places to find Him is in the Adoration Chapel.”

Iraqi Christians Return Home

We hear about the “enormously large city” of Nineveh in today’s first reading (Jonah 3). Nineveh was the largest city in the world for many years and was a capital city in the Assyrian Empire. It is located in present-day Iraq, commonly known as part of Mosul. I was recently reading about Nineveh and the work that the Knights of Columbus are doing to restore Christianity in post-ISIS Iraq. This has brought much encouragement and hope to those Christians who have been terribly persecuted and exiled, of course, but also to those of us who have been praying for them for years. Here are excerpts from an article, “Iraqi Christians Return Home” (koc.org, 11/1/17).

May you know the peace of Christ,

Fr Greg

___________

The photograph on the floor of Sabhia Franco’s destroyed house in Karamles recalled more peaceful times in Iraq. The black and white picture showed a crowd watching a float passing in a parade. Atop the float is a cross standing beside a mosque. “Peace comes to a peaceful community “is written below. On the back of the photo in blue ink: “Mosul Spring Festival 1970. “

Franso said those memories have now been replaced by the horror of more recent events. The 66-year-old woman and her 85-year-old husband were among the last of the nearly 10,000 inhabitants of Karamles to leave after Islamic State fighters overran their village on the Nineveh Plain in August 2014. Robbed at gunpoint and then forced to flee on foot, they have spent the last three years living nearly 50 miles to the east in Erbil, the capital of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

Now, with ISIS driven from northern Iraq, they are among the first families to have returned to their ancestral homeland, thanks in large part to an initiative launched by the Knights of Columbus at the 135th Supreme Convention in St. Louis Aug 1…

A newly erected cross stand in a Karamles plaza that was devastated by Islamic State militants who had overrun the town until it was liberated in October 2016.

…Since 2014, the Order’s Christian Refugee Relief Fund has donated more than $13 million in humanitarian assistance, primarily in Iraq, Syria and the surrounding region.

“Without the help of the Knights of Columbus, the Christians of Iraq would have disappeared, “said Chaldean Catholic Archbishop Bashar Matti Warda of Erbil, under whose auspices much of the refugee relief has been provided.

The K of C initiative to resettle and rebuild Karamles is part of the Nineveh Reconstruction Project, administered in partnership with the international papal charity Aid to the Church in Need as well as local Christian communities.

In October last year, at the start of the military operation to liberate Nineveh province, Iraqi security forces drove the Islamic State from Karamles. Nearly nine months later, in early July, the remaining fighters were dislodged from Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, located just 20 miles west of Karamles. Today, only isolated pockets of Islamic State resistance remain elsewhere in Iraq.

In September, the government restored electricity to Karamles, though as with other towns across Iraq service has been patchy.

“Water is on for six to eight hours a day, “said Father Thabet Habib Yousif, who is overseeing the restoration of the town from a busy church hall filled with paint, plaster and plumbing fittings.

…Already, more than 120 families are back home, living in houses that have been restored through the K of C-supported Nineveh Restoration Project.

“This project has had an immediate impact on the displaced people from Karamles, “Archbishop Warda said. “Before, most of these people were completely filled with uncertainty. They wanted to move back to their homes, but most of them had no money to repair them. This project has allowed them to begin moving back as a group, which has made all the difference. “

Calling the project, a “tremendous success, “Archbishop Warda added that more help was critical. “We still have several more towns that need a project like this in order for them to be stabilized enough so that the long term rebuilding of viable communities can take place.“

After local militias known as the Nineveh Protection Units, consisting largely of Assyrian Christians, took charge of security for the village and nearby towns, his family was not afraid to return.

“We have faith in God, “he said, “and also the guards who protect the village. “

… “We’re sleeping easy with the security, and there’s electricity and water, “ (Shafiq Shabi) said. “This is a happy ending to a sad story.”

Listen for God with your heart

“How can I hear God?” One woman asked this with some exasperation at Bible study when we discussed today’s first reading (Sam 3) of Samuel hearing the voice of God. It is a question to which we all want the answer. Every day. St. Teresa of Avila taught that “Jesus is always speaking to us; the question is, are we listening?” If we are men and women who pray daily, read and meditate on Scripture regularly, and come into the Real Presence of the Lord in Adoration, then we are listening. Of course, these are not the only ways to hear God, but they are the best.

To that point, we will increase our hours of Eucharistic Adoration on Wednesdays starting in Lent. I will explain the significance of this for us as a parish in the days ahead. For each of us, it will provide a tremendous opportunity to hear God. The first time in my life that I heard the voice of God was when I started praying in Adoration. I promise you that God will reward whatever time you give to adore Jesus, and it very well might be an experience of hearing Him.

I thought that the words of another priest would help would be more beneficial when it comes to hearing God. So, here is a good reflection by Fr. Killian J. Healy at www.catholicexchange.com. See you at Wednesday Adoration!

May you know the peace of Christ,

Fr Greg


 

God does not have to use external words and signs to attract our attention and convey ideas to us. He enters our minds directly. He speaks secretly, noiselessly, as befits the Divinity. It is only by faith that we know He is working in us. For example, God once spoke in a special, hidden way to St. Peter, who then confessed Jesus to be the Son of God. “Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona,” said our Lord. “For flesh and blood hath not revealed this to thee, but my Father in Heaven.”

St. John tells us that we will know all things from the Holy Spirit: “But you have an anointing from the Holy One, and you know all things.” St. Paul says that God enters our very thoughts: “Not that we are sufficient to think anything of ourselves, as of ourselves, but our sufficiency is from God.”

God also enters our hearts and inspires us to holy desires. “And a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, from the city of Thyatira, who worshiped God, was listening; and the Lord touched her heart to give heed to what was being said by Paul.”

Thus, the Scriptures and the Church tell us that God speaks to us in the silence of our minds and hearts. He speaks to all men, but all men do not hear Him. God speaks to our mind and heart when we kneel to meditate or to adore Him in the Blessed Sacrament. He enters our mind when the passing things of time excite our thoughts. It is He who gives us holy thoughts to conquer our temptations. It is He who stirs up within us the desire to persevere against all adversaries.

Perhaps we have never realized that God is illuminating our intellect and inspiring our will. Yet He does just that. That is why we are told not to do all the talking in prayer. For, if we continually recite vocal prayers without pausing now and then to think, we will stifle the thoughts and desires that God wishes to excite in us.

St. Thérèse of Lisieux tells us how she listened to the voice of God. “I know and have experienced that ‘the Kingdom of God is within us,’ that our Master has no need of books or teacher to instruct a soul. The Teacher of teachers instructs without sound of words, and though I have never heard Him speak, yet I know He is within me, always guiding and inspiring me; and just when I need them, lights, hitherto unseen, break in upon me. As a rule, it is not during prayer that this happens, but in the midst of my daily duties.”

But we are not only to listen; it would be folly to remain in a state of mental blankness, waiting for God to speak. No, prayer is a loving conversation, and, when the Holy Spirit moves us, it is time to begin our part of the colloquy.

One way, then, to practice the exercise of the presence of God is to listen to God, to be aware that He speaks to us, to be ever conscious that God can use all things to communicate with us.

Can you write your story of faith? This was a question I recently asked a friend as we were discussing our journeys with the Lord. She pondered it, and then thought it would be hard mainly because she didn’t know exactly how she came to be a devout Catholic. She kind of laughed at herself while she was saying this, and it might seem humorous to us, too. But, some in our own congregation might have the same thought: how exactly did I come to really believe in and follow the Lord? Today’s feast of the Epiphany might help to pinpoint exactly the struggle for my friend or anyone else. What was our epiphany about the Lord and when did we have it?

When we talk about the Epiphany, we are referring to the outward manifestation of the Lord to the Magi and to the world. He is revealed to them as the Christ, and they “come to do him homage”. Their epiphany occurred through a star which led them to the baby Jesus. They were “overjoyed” during this experience, and gave treasures to the Lord of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. When we hear that they “departed for their country by another way” , we can interpret it as this event changed their lives. This would be the starting point in their stories of faith.

I have described to you my journey of faith in homilies, but I don’t think I’ve written it here in any great detail. Please forgive me if I have! My epiphany happened with the Eucharist. My “star” was Msgr. Thomas Wells. And, it happened when I was 21 years old. I was raised Catholic and went to Catholic schools through the first half of college. Even though I was taught Catholic doctrine at home and in school, not much sunk in the first 21 years of life. I was a clueless Catholic.

But, then, one day, Msgr. Wells and I were talking about the Eucharist. He said, “Greg, ‘this is my body’ means this is my body”. Epiphany! That was the first time I had really heard the teaching on the Real Presence. And, it blew me away. I had heard those words (“this is my body”) hundreds of times before at Sunday Mass, but they never really registered in my mind or heart. And then, after the one-sentence epiphany (or revelation), I saw everything differently: God, Mass, the Cross, the Church, Confession, and life. I began to “do him homage” at daily Mass and Adoration, and was having the same experience of being “overjoyed” as the Magi. Of course, this all changed my life as it did theirs.

In talking to many people for the past 25 years, I realize that not many can point to one moment – and certainly not one sentence – as their epiphany of who Jesus really is. For many, it has been engrained in them since childhood. They have always just believed. But, they have had a multitude of personal epiphanies about the Lord as Savior, Master, brother, friend, Good Shepherd, Prince of Peace, Healer, Divine Physician, etc. For others, the epiphany came as adults, and often in a way that Christ appeared to them in a personal way. That is really the underlying point to our epiphanies: an encounter with the living God in a person, Jesus Christ. Yes, the Magi were overjoyed at “seeing the star”, but only because it “stopped over the place where the child was”. They were so happy because they were encountering the Son of God. As much as I liked Msgr. Wells for 5 years before my epiphany, I didn’t find true joy until he led me to encounter the Son of God in the Eucharist. That’s when the Lord and faith became personal. That’s when an epiphany had taken place, thanks be to God.

So, here is the epiphany formula for the Magi and hopefully all of us:

  • God will show you a star – something or someone that will lead you to where He is.
  • God will reveal Himself to you in a personal and profound way.
  • Do Him homage.
  • You will be overjoyed in your encounter with Him.
  • Offer Him gifts (e.g., your life as gold)
  • Go home a different way (i.e., change your life)

Christ is born!

Fr Greg

Message of an Angel

4th Sunday of Advent
“Demonic” stuff / families
Spiritual warfare
     Heaven
     Earth
     Us
Discernment of spirits
Mary and her yes
    Son of God born to us!

Make straight the way of the Lord

On this 3rd Sunday of Advent, the Church uses the halfway point to Christmas to rejoice. This is called “Gaudete Sunday” which comes from the Latin “to rejoice”. One of the things about which we rejoice, believe it or not, is in the Sacrament of Confession. Yes, we “rejoice heartily in the Lord” for this major means of help to “make straight the way of the Lord”.

Last week, I gave you a little insight into roughly the same line from Isaiah (“make straight in the wasteland a highway for our God!”) as well as a few questions to examine your conscience. The most basic way to explain what Isaiah proclaims and St. John the Baptist fulfills is to get straight with the Lord. Confession helps us to get straight with the Lord before He comes.

For many of you, it may be that you want to go to Confession, but don’t know what to confess. Typically, we prepare for the Sacrament by examining our consciences with the Ten Commandments. What may be more helpful for you is the following examination of conscience that I found online at www.patheos.com/blogs/kathyschiffer. It uses the seven deadly sins and the four cardinal virtues as a guide. I hope it helps.

Feel free to bring this into the confessional at the Penance Service on Tuesday. See you there!

May you know the peace of Christ,

Fr Greg

 

Have I practiced the virtue of Chastity?

For example:

  • Have I permitted myself to watch movies or daytime television shows which are not edifying, which depict sexual scenarios, or which advocate for cohabitation or homosexual relationships?

Have I practiced the virtue of Temperance?

For example:

  • Have I indulged my love of sweets or snack foods, to the detriment of my health?
  • Have I continued to smoke heavily, or to consume alcoholic beverages excessively?
  • Have I been immoderate in any activity, such as watching too much TV?

Have I practiced the virtue of Charity?

For example:

  • Have I been a “busybody,” unkind to a neighbor either by my thoughts or by my actions?
  • Have I had a smile for a family member or loved one, or was I critical, hurting someone’s feelings?

Have I practiced the virtue of Diligence?

For example:

  • Have I used my physical limitations as an excuse for laziness?
  • Have I neglected prayer, ignored my friend’s birthday, sat around the house when I might have helped with the dishes?
  • Have I exercised my responsibility to become familiar with the issues, and to vote (by absentee ballot, if necessary) for the candidates who will best protect the values I hold dear?

Have I practiced the virtue of Patience?

For example:

  • Was I unkind (or downright rude) to a telephone caller, impatient with a visitor, crabby when things didn’t go just the way I wanted?
  • Did I complain if someone took me to a restaurant or public place, because we had to wait for service?
  • Did I criticize my doctor, my caretaker, my child, for not serving me better?

Have I practiced the virtue of Kindness?

For example:

  • Was I jealous of the attention paid to someone else, wanting everyone to notice me instead?
  • Did I feel angry because someone else had more money, or better health, or because my grown children did not have enough time to spend with me?
  • Did I compliment someone who looked good, or did I only have harsh words to say?

Have I practiced the virtue of Humility?

For example:

  • Did I accept a compliment graciously but then move on, refusing to keep the attention turned toward myself?
  • Was I willing to let someone else be the center of attention?
  • Did I feel grateful for the kindness of my family and others, and appreciative of my caregiver’s efforts?
  • Did I believe that I had no need of confession, because I never even leave the house?

Lord, help us to recognize the times that we have failed to live a virtuous life—and grant us the grace of true contrition and a resolve to do Your will. Amen.

Be a Herald of Glad Tidings

“Prepare the way of the Lord!”

We hear this regularly in Advent, but what exactly does this look like? We have the familiar image of St. John the Baptist literally preparing the way of the Lord by announcing his coming. He is referenced in the Gospel today as the one prophesied by Isaiah: “Behold I am sending my messenger ahead of you; he will prepare your way.” John prepared the world for the coming of the Christ. How do we prepare the way of the Lord?

God offers us several ways that we can prepare the way of the Lord through Isaiah in today’s first reading (Is 40:1-5, 9-11):

  • Make straight in the wasteland a highway for our God!” Do we waste time on a regular basis? When we look at how we spend our time, do we see periods of wasteland? Advent gives us a good opportunity to do something productive during those times. Even if it’s just 10 or 15 minutes spent doing spiritual reading or praying the rosary, it is an experience of being productive (like building a road) rather than wasteful.
  • Every valley shall be filled in.” In December, our rectory receives calls from people who are in different financial valleys as they approach Christmas. Most of these folks are worried about getting presents for their kids because they didn’t sign up for the Outreach Center’s toy giveaway and have nowhere else to turn. Thankfully, donors have already offered to help families in these emergency situations and get their children personalized gifts. Be generous and thoughtful in your almsgiving this Advent!
  • Every mountain and hill shall be made low.” The woman who leads our new monthly Holy Spirit Rosary told me that someone she prayed with the last time she was here received a physical healing. Her hip pain had disappeared!

If I were to ask you what mountains or hills you have in your life now, many of you would say physical pain or ailments. Whether our mountains are physical, emotional, or personal, God can make them low (or even remove them altogether)! If we are alert and awake in our faith, then we are open to the graces –sometimes miraculous – that God wants to give.

  • “The rugged land shall be made a plain.” Is there a rough or rugged situation in your life right now? Is there someone from whom you need to ask forgiveness? Is there someone you need to forgive?
  • Go up onto a high mountain, Zion, herald of glad tidings; cry out at the top of your voice, Jerusalem, herald of good news! Fear not to cry out.” Last weekend, we had a spectacular wedding here involving a young couple. The bride and groom selected our church because they said it is “the most beautiful church we’ve ever seen.” Her family has visited here a few times, and has fallen in love with our congregation. We received rave reviews from the wedding crowd who had an incredibly positive experience of church here. We had evangelized them with our joy, warmth, hospitality, and faith. Yes, I went a little John the Baptist on them in the homily and preached the truth which they said was inspiring. But, that was after they heard the stories of your joyful and loving spirit, encountered your kindness in and around the church, and saw a bunch of my smiles (I’m a proud papa at weddings, baptisms, confirmations, and first Holy Communions). By the time I said a word about marriage or faith during the wedding, we had already evangelized them!

Evangelize your family this Advent and Christmas. I don’t mean to speak to them at the top of your voice. I mean to be a herald of glad tidings. Show them a joyful or forgiving spirit that is uniquely Christian. That could very well be the precursor for them asking about the good news of the Gospel. In this way, you will prepare the way of the Lord!

May you know the peace of Christ,

Fr Greg

Don’t be afraid to cry out

2nd Sunday of Advent
FPO’s + SJB

Fools for Christ

Hard core
People liked hearing SJB
Focused / mission
One thing – God

What is your focus?
ADVENT – helps us to re-focus

    Our one thing is Christ
What stands out about you (for Jesus)?

We all have had a SJB
Are you him to others?

     Evangelization
     Don’t be afraid to cry out!

What it really means to be “the least”

“Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of the least brothers of mine, you did for me”

Plentiful gifts of sustenance

A week ago Saturday, we had almost 100 families come to the parish hall to pick up their Thanksgiving baskets through the Pope Francis Outreach Center. Last week, a few more hundred families came to pick up theirs. God is so good to provide so abundantly through the generosity of our donors, staff, and volunteers! He truly gives us a chance to live out the corporal works of mercy spelled out in today’s Gospel – “I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink”. And, given that it’s in celebration of Thanksgiving, I hope that all of our families gave thanks to God for his gracious and plentiful gifts of sustenance.

Sometimes we need help

On their side of this, none of the families would enjoy being considered the “least of my brothers (and sisters).” In our pride, none of us want to be in the category of poor or needy. We want to be among those who are strong and self-sufficient. But, sometimes life brings us to our knees, and we need help. This happens to all of us at one time or another. How many of the “powerful” in our country are being brought to their knees vis-à-vis scandal? When we are in serious need – like putting food on the Thanksgiving table – pride takes a back seat to humility. In a spiritual sense and brought home by today’s readings, humility is good. It’s actually replete in the Gospel that humility is necessary for God and goodness to work in us.

The King of Kings

The amazing thing about today’s Gospel passage is that the Lord equates the poor and needy with Himself. He tells a parable about a king, and the king identifies himself as hungry, thirsty, stranger, naked, ill, and imprisoned. Wait, how can a king live this way? He is supposed to be strong, powerful, and in total control. Only one king has ever lived this way fully, and He is the greatest King ever. Christ is the King of kings! A true king is a shepherd, a point that was driven home well by the Old Testament prophets like Ezekiel. The true king says, “The lost I will seek out, the strayed I will bring back, the injured I will bind up, the sick I will heal”. Christ did all of these and more – He lived as they lived.

Union with Christ the King

So, for those who might be upset at first to be called “the least”, this Gospel and feast of Christ the King shows that they are in good company. They are in the best company! They are in the company of and union with Christ the King. Whenever we wait in line for the spiritual nourishment of the Mass, sacraments, Adoration, Bible study, etc., we are spiritually putting ourselves in the category of the needy. This is much better than being among the “sleek and the strong” to whom the Lord says “I will destroy”. We are spiritually among the least of the Lord’s brethren, and are in union with the King of the Universe.

May you know the peace of Christ the King,

Fr Greg

Blogging for faith

What is a blog site? This will hopefully become a frequent question at our parish because I want to start such a site here. Blog sites are all over the internet. They are websites where people become authors on different topics, and oftentimes others can leave comments in response. I have run two blog sites in the past, and they garnered a fair amount of traffic and commentary about church teachings, spiritual reflections, and world events. In some cases, the blog sites helped bring people back to the Church and sacraments. In all other cases, it was just good to engage people in an online community involving faith.

The way it will work is that we will establish a blogsite online and publicize the address for the site. I will post my thoughts, questions, and reflections; it will be similar material to what I write here. You and anyone else will be able to make comments or ask questions in relation to what I post, and even respond to other “bloggers” on the site. This is part of our family evangelization, so the big hope is that your family members will visit the site and even ask me questions. I will have them in mind when I post on prayer, forgiveness, sacraments, serving the poor, etc.

Here is an example of an actual exchange from years ago between two people who left comments on my post on Confession:

“Kiwi” said:

I kind of need a step before Confession. I am not ready to go to Confession and say that I have decided to ‘return’ and will try to go to Mass every Sunday.

Anonymous said:

Hey Kiwi, Confession is no big deal if I can do it anyone can. No one is going to judge you and you really feel like you are getting a load off of your shoulders. If you don’t want the priest to see you just go to the window side.

As you can see, people don’t need to leave their names. They can comment “anonymously”, but hopefully they grow out of that in time. Here are more examples of anonymous bloggers with some powerful comments:

Anonymous said:

Why does God have to be so elusive about communicating our callings? His silence can really be deafening. Why do we have to search and search and wait and wait? Please don’t tell me that God speaks to some people and not others.

Anonymous said:

Great news! My dad does not have cancer! It was a mix-up! I am so thankful to God!! What are the different ways we can show God our gratefulness?

Anonymous said:

Why do some people suffer so much and others only encounter minimal suffering? Life does seem “unfair!” Why do some people lose a child-the worst grief possible? I don’t think we will ever know the why on this side of heaven. When I am suffering, I stopped asking “why” and started asking “what.” What do you want me to do Lord? What is your will for me in this situation? The why question leaves me stuck in neutral because it is a mystery for now. The what question will help you to pick up your cross and walk with it.

There is some pretty good stuff here. I know and have experienced that there is some nasty stuff online, so please be assured that all comments are moderated. It will be a site of respect and class. And, hopefully, it will be one that will help to bring back the lost sheep of Assumption. Keep praying for that, please!

May you know the peace of Christ,

Fr Greg